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Welcome to

New Park Court Chambers

"Regarded as ‘one of the most prominent sets for crime in the North of England’."
- Legal 500 2015

Private Client

"Clients 'would strongly recommend New Park Court Chambers to anyone looking for a strong criminal or regulatory lawyer'."
- Chambers and Partners 2016

Paul Greaney QC 1993 (QC 2010)

PaulGreaney

Introduction

Recommended in the leading legal directories for (a) crime, (b) inquests and public inquiries, (c) regulation and professional discipline and (d) sports law in the following terms:

“…market sources consider him one of the best silks in the country. He is routinely instructed in high-profile homicide and organised crime cases, and offers broader expertise in the areas of financial crime and sports law … Absolutely a leader in his field, a top-class advocate. He is extremely bright, excellent with clients and cerebral in his approach. … He’s absolutely brilliant, and has both excellent judgement and brilliant natural authority, as well as great questioning skills” [2017].

“He is the complete article, from preparation to client handling. His advocacy skills are second to none … Head and shoulders above everyone else in a courtroom, he doesn’t waste a syllable and in cross-examination he gets admissions which no one else can … Measured, calm and focused” [2016].

“He’s the best; if you can get him you’re lucky” and “he commands respect in the courtroom” [2015].

“… the complete package” … “a prime example of a modern silk through his combination of first-class advocacy and advice with a commercial and client-oriented approach” and as “communicating with great ease at every level” [2014].

“(Has) immaculate advocacy skills” [2013].

“(Has) the rare ability to control the courtroom no matter who the tribunal” and “very industrious in the pursuit of client’s interests” [2012].

Described in the Times as one of the country’s leading criminal lawyers”.

Featured in the following article about the Hillsborough Inquests, in which he appeared as leading counsel for one of the participants:

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/hillsborough-disaster-how-the-cross-examination-of-david-duckenfield-was-a-shocking-landmark-in-the-10124308.html

Appointments

1993                     Year of call

1995                     Tenant at what is now New Park Court Chambers

2002                     Attorney General’s panel of advocates (crime)

2009                     Criminal junior of the year (Chambers & Partners)

2010                     Queen’s Counsel

2012                     Head of Criminal Team, New Park Court Chambers

2016                     Recorder

2016                     Bencher of the Inner Temple

Scope of Practice

  • Serious crime, principally homicide, financial crime and organised crime, including crime with an international and/or terrorism aspect.  Often advises at the investigation stage.  Much work is conducted on a privately funded basis, although does continue to act on a publicly funded basis in some cases.
  • Regulatory crime, with an emphasis on health and safety enforcement, trading standards issues, environmental health and prosecutions arising out of planning disputes.  Often advises at the investigation stage.
  • Disciplinary proceedings, including proceedings before professional sporting bodies, (eg. acted in the Football Association proceedings in the Suarez/Evra racist abuse case and the Anelka “quenelle” case), police misconduct proceedings and proceedings before the General Medical Council.
  • Inquests, particularly those involving allegations about the conduct of the police and/or medical practitioners and those involving health and safety issues (eg. acted as leading counsel on behalf of the Police Federation at the Hillsborough inquests and on behalf of the owners of one of the tallest buildings in the UK at an inquest into a death said to be linked to the design of that structure and currently acts on behalf of the family of Pte. Sean Benton at the Deepcut Inquest).
  • Warrants and production orders.  Regularly instructed on behalf of companies and prominent individuals in challenges, eg. acted on behalf of a media organisation on many occasions on applications for production orders by the Metropolitan Police arising out of the phone hacking investigation.
  • Public law, particularly claims relating to the criminal justice system, police law and coronial law, but extending but other areas of the law.
  • Police law.
  • Licensing.

Directory Recommendations for Crime

Chambers & Partners

In 2017: Extremely well regarded on the circuit, market sources consider him one of the best silks in the country. He is routinely instructed in high-profile homicide and organised crime cases, and offers broader expertise in the areas of financial crime and sports law … Absolutely a leader in his field, a top-class advocate. He is extremely bright, excellent with clients and cerebral in his approach. He is always well prepared and was outstanding in Hillsborough: you’d struggle to find a better silk in this area.”

In 2016: This experienced silk is often instructed in serious homicide, organised and financial crime cases. He has achieved renown due to his involvement in numerous headline-grabbing matters. Strengths: “It’s no coincidence that he’s a name on all the high-profile cases on circuit.” “He is the complete article, from preparation to client handling. His advocacy skills are second to none.”

In 2015: “His attention to detail is second to none; he is very methodical in the way he approaches cases.” “He’s the best; if you can get him you’re lucky because there will be no one else in the courtroom who knows the case as well as him.”

In 2014: “A young silk who has swiftly established himself as one of the leading lights of the North Eastern circuit. Commentators describe him as “the complete package,” pointing to him as a prime example of a modern silk through his combination of first-class advocacy and advice with a commercial and client-oriented approach” … ”He is highly skilled and extremely conscientious. His client care skills, his legal knowledge, his efficiency and his organisation are all first-rate, and his advocacy second to none.”

In 2013: “rapidly making an impressive name for himself following his appointment in 2010 … recently handled some high-profile murders … also handles large-scale fraud cases … very industrious … very much an ascending star … gravitas”.

In 2012: Paul Greaney Q.C.’s practice encompasses regulatory, appellate and serious crime. Sources describe him as “very industrious” in his pursuit of clients’ interests”.

In 2011:  “New silk … especially noted for his client handling … also received praise for his ‘excellent advocacy skills’”.

In 2010: “… at Park Court Chambers is ‘outstanding junior advocate’ Paul Greaney.  He tackles cases for the prosecution and the defence and is a master of murder, fraud and other criminal cases.  Commentators note that he has had a particularly good couple of years having appeared in cases such as R v Norris, the murder by a nurse of four of his patients” – Top of Band One of criminal juniors.

In 2009: “eloquent and charismatic” – Band One of criminal juniors.

In 2008: “his victories speak for themselves”.

 

Legal 500

In 2017: “Highly regarded for financial crime, homicide and organised crime cases”

In 2016: “… the go to silk on circuit”.

In 2015: “He commands respect in the courtroom”.

In 2014: “Communicates with great ease at every level”.

In 2013: “… immaculate advocacy skills”.

In 2012: “… has the rare ability to control the courtroom no matter who the tribunal is”.

In 2010: recommended criminal practitioner.

In 2009: “Noted criminal practitioner…has successfully modified his Practice into regulatory areas”.

In 2008: “excels in serious crime”.

 

Recommendations for Inquests and Public Inquiries

Chambers & Partners

In 2017: “Brings his in-depth knowledge of criminal law to the inquests sphere. He receives considerable praise for his superb cross-examination and advocacy skills … He’s absolutely brilliant, and has both excellent judgement and brilliant natural authority, as well as great questioning skills.” “He put the client’s case forward in a crystal-clear way. A very, very effective cross-examiner and a very good lawyer all round.”

In 2016: “Head and shoulders above everyone else in a courtroom, he doesn’t waste a syllable and in cross-examination he gets admissions which no one else can.” “Measured, calm and focused.”

 

Recommendations for Regulation and Professional Discipline

Chambers & Partners

In 2011: “New silk … scores well with solicitors”

In 2010: “Paul Greaney of Park Court Chambers is a top choice for medical defence work in the North. ‘There is absolutely nobody in the same league as him on circuit’ say commentators”.

In 2009:  “Paul Greaney of Park Court Chambers is a popular choice for serious and long-running issues, rather than more run-of-the-mill cases.   He is highly sought-after as a result of his lengthy experience and the clarity with which he explains his position”.

In 2008: “Paul Greaney of 6 Kings Bench Walk is ‘exceptionally bright and someone who really defends hard’.  His main set, Park Court Chambers in Leeds, is said to be the leading northern set for police disciplinary law and Greaney provides the backbone”.

Legal 500

In 2017: “Highly regarded for inquests, professional discipline and health and safety prosecutions”.

In 2016: “Experienced”.

In 2015: “Up to date, engaged and always available when needed”.

In 2014: “Highly recommended”.

 

Recommendations for Sports Law

Chambers and Partners

In 2017: Gifted criminal barrister with an excellent record for handling regulatory and serious crime, inquests and public law. Frequently called upon by the Football Association to advise on high-profile disciplinary proceedings”.

In 2016: Regularly instructed to prosecute footballers charged with disciplinary offences by the FA … Successfully prosecuted Benoit Assou Ekotto, following an improper conduct charge relating to a tweet”.

In 2015 (of Suarez/Evra): “I was impressed with how he set out his case from the start. He knew where he was going and got there.”

Experience

Homicide and Other Serious Crime

Has prosecuted and defended in many homicide cases.  Has a particular interest in cases involving complex psychiatric issues (diminished responsibility, loss of control and fitness to plead) and scientific issues (including issues relating to the reliability of LCN DNA results and the relevance of stochastic effects to DNA findings).

A small selection of recent serious crime cases of significance (all of which attracted substantial media attention) include:

  • R. v Corbett and others [2017]: prosecution of four persons for the torture and murder of a vulnerable man; the “Dark Ages Torture” murder case.
  • R. v Colin Gregg [2017]: prosecution of a member of the Greggs the Bakers family for historical sexual abuse.
  • R. v Boots [2017]: prosecution of a police inspector and others for corruption.
  •  R. v Syeedy [2016]: prosecution of the murderer of a local Imam; “ISIS inspired”.
  • R. v X [2015]: prosecution of a schoolboy for plotting an ISIS attack on an Anzac Day parade in Melbourne:
  • R. v Amaro [2015]: defence of a nurse charged with manslaughter by gross negligence arising out of the death of a child in hospital.
  • R. v William Cornick [2014]: prosecution of the schoolboy who stabbed his Spanish teacher to death in class:
  • R. v Rosser [2014]: prosecution of a psychopath for the sadistic murder of a child.
  • R. v Rahman [2013]: prosecution of a man charged with the murder of his partner against a background of serious domestic violence.
  • R. v Hanley [2013]: defence of a man charged with the execution of an alleged police informer.
  • R. v Hutton [2013]: prosecution of a mother who starved her child to death and then kept the child’s mummified body in her bedroom for almost two years.
  • R. v Yakub [2013]: defence of an Afghani charged with the murder of his wife; defence of diminished responsibility.
  • R. v Jenkinson [2013]: defence of a 16-year-old boy charged with murder; loss of control issues.
  • R. v Dormer [2013]: defence of a woman charged with the murder of her partner; defence of diminished responsibility.
  • R. v Mallin [2013]: defence of a man charged with murder in a cutthroat case involving complex issues of joint enterprise liability.
  • R. v McFadden and others [2013]:  prosecution of one of the largest police corruption cases ever.
  • R. v Church [2013]: defence of the first defendant in a notorious West Yorkshire murder trial; complex issues relating to material published on social networking sites during the course of the trial.
  • R. v Barnes [2012]: defence of a man charged with the murder of his baby child; highly complex issues of medical causation.
  • R. v Norkus [2012]: defence of a man charged with the murder of a man during street violence; complex joint enterprise issues.
  • R. v Beck [2012]: defence of a man charged with manslaughter arising out his consumption, with the deceased, of methadone; complex issues of causation and abuse of process.
  • R. v Cairns [2012]: defence of a man of good character charged with the murder of his sister; defence of diminished responsibility.
  • R. v Graeme Jarman [2012]: defence of a serial criminal charged with the “Hexham murder”; complex issues relating to secondary and tertiary transfer of DNA.
  • R. v Wilkinson [2012]: defence of a solider who, on return from active service in Afghanistan, shot and killed a friend; complex psychiatric issues; defence of diminished responsibility under the new section 2 test.
  • R. v Arif and others [2012]: eight handed prosecution of persons for the murder of Gavin Clarke (aka “Nasty”, a well known figure in Chapeltown) and conspiracy to pervert the course of justice; the killing provoked rioting in Leeds.

Has appeared in many serious and complex fraud cases, eg.

  • Currently acting on behalf of the former director of a major international company in corruption proceedings in another EC country.
  • R. v WI [2014]: defence of a prominent Yorkshire businessman on a charge of conspiracy to defraud.
  • R. v H and G [2012]: prosecution of two solicitors for a £1,000,000 fraud on the client account of the commercial property firm of which they were the senior partners.
  • R v. B [2011]: defence of a solicitor charged with a fraud on the client account of the firm of which she was principal.
  • R v K.D [2010]: defence of the first defendant in a trial arising out of an alleged massive procurement fraud on contractors within the railway industry.

Has appeared in many cases concerning complex money laundering issues, always involving significant sums.

Has appeared on behalf of members of the legal profession charged with serious criminal offences, including the managing partner of a well-known firm on a charge of conspiracy to pervert the course of justice and a barrister on a charge of wounding with intent.

Regulatory Offences

Has been involved in many serious and complicated health and safety prosecutions, including cases involving multiple fatalities and complex issues of law.  That has involved defending individuals, companies and organisations facing allegations, and prosecuting such cases, eg.

  • R. v Sherwood Rise Limited [2015]: defence of the operator of a care home on a charge of corporate manslaughter and health and safety offences; instructed by Kamrans.
  • R. v X [2013]: defence of a prominent figure charged with offences relating to alterations to a listed building; instructed by Gordons.
  • R. v C Ltd. [2013]: defence of a major company in connection with one of the largest prosecutions ever mounted by the Environment Agency; instructed by Ward Hadaway.
  • R. v National Trust [2012]: defence of the National Trust in a case regarded as being of national importance to the organisation; complex issues relating to enforcement responsibility; instructed by Berrymans.
  • R. v UK Coal Plc, JA and TD [2011]: defence of the manager of a coal mine on a prosecution arising out of a mining fatality; instructed by Irwin Mitchell.
  • R. v WEFCO (Gainsborough) Limited [2011]: defence of a company charged in respect of a serious crushing accident; instructed by Everyman Legal.
  • R. v Craegmore Healthcare Limited [2010]: prosecution of a company operating care homes in respect of the death of a patient caused by restraint.
  • R v Matrix Direct Recycle Limited and CT [2010]: defence of the operations director of a company on charges arising out of mercury poisoning of company employees; instructed by Ward Hadaway.
  • R v Next Distribution Limited [2009]: defence of national company on serious health and safety charges; instructed by DLA Piper.
  •  R v MacDonald [2009]: defence of prominent distributor of pesticides by DEFRA; instructed by Hill Dickinson.
  •  R v H.T.M: prosecution arising out of a double fatality; Crown Court at Middlesbrough; led to the leading case on a number of aspects of health and safety legislation.
  • R v Pola: defence of a businessman said to be responsible for building work causing an accident which severely disabled a worker; led to a Court of Appeal ruling on the ambit of the term “employment” in the 1974 Act; instructed by Kamrans.
  • R v Richmond Homes Limited: defence of a company and its managing director; asbestos case; instructed by Lupton Fawcett.
  • R v Strimech Engineering Limited: prosecution of a company in respect of a fatal accident.

Disciplinary Proceedings

Represented the Football Association in the proceedings brought against Luis Suarez, the Liverpool player in respect of his racial abuse of Patrice Evra, the Manchester United player [2011], in the proceedings brought against Everton FC in respect of the tapping up of Jamaal Lascelles [2013] and in the proceedings brought against Nicolas Anelka in respect of his use of the quenelle gesture [2014] and Benoit Assou-Ekotto for tweeting his support for Anelka’s gesture [2014].

Inquests

Has acted on behalf of companies and company directors, police officers, doctors and other interested persons at inquests involving deaths in police custody and in hospital or in connection with medical treatment and in other circumstances.  That has included:

  • Led the team (comprising other barristers, including a second QC, solicitors, paralegals and researchers) representing the Police Federation at the Hillsborough Inquests.
  • Acting on behalf of the owners of a prominent, city centre commercial development at the inquest into a death said to have been connected with a wind tunnel effect created by the building.
  • Acting on behalf of many custody sergeants in relation to deaths in custody, eg the Christopher Alder Inquest (at one time the longest single death inquest in history).
  • Acting on behalf of a police officer involved in the death of a football fan during football violence, the Coles Inquest.
  • Also appears on behalf of interested persons at inquests involving complicated health and safety issues.  Long experience of acting on behalf of individuals, companies and organisations at such hearings.

Public Law

Particularly claims relating to the criminal justice system, police law and coronial law.  Cases have included:

  • Challenges to the jurisdiction of the Crown Court (R. (W) v Leeds Crown Court [2012] 1 Cr.App.R 13).
  • Challenges to inquest verdicts (the Hillsborough disaster proceedings and R. (Dawson) v Hull Coroner).
  • Challenges to decisions of the D.P.P not to prosecute (R. (M) v DPP).
  • Challenges to the ECHR compatibility of the predecessor body to the IPCC (R. (Boot) v PCA).
  • Challenges to decisions made in police misconduct proceedings (R. (Wilkinson) v Chief Constable of West Yorkshire, R. (Kay) v Chief Constable of Northumbria (no 1 and no 2) [2010]; R. (French) v Chief Constable of West Yorkshire [2011], R. (Montgomery) v Police Appeals Tribunal and the Commissioner of the Metropolis [2012] and R. (Chief Constable of Durham) v Police Appeals Tribunal ex. p Cooper [2012]).
  • Challenges based on bias by decision makers (R. (Dawson) v Hull Coroner and R. (French) v Chief Constable of West Yorkshire [2011]).
  • Challenges to decisions of the GMC, representing the GMC (R. (Evans) v GMC [2010]).
  • Acted in two major claims relating to the interpretation of the Police (Conduct) Regulations 2008.

Licensing

Has acted on behalf of those applying for licences and also for Police Forces.   Has also undertaken firearms licence appeals.

Cases Outside the UK

Has conducted cases in Fiji, including in the Court of Appeal and Supreme Court of Fiji as a temporary member of the Bar of Fiji.

Currently acting on behalf of the former director of a major international company in corruption proceedings in another EC country.

Recent Appellate Level/Administrative Court Cases

  • R. v Bell [2016] 1 WLR 1: approach to sentence in historic homicide cases; article 7 ECHR.
  • R.v Cornick [2015] 1 Cr.App.R.(S) 69: appropriate approach to sentence for horrific murder committed by a child.
  • Attorney-General v HM Coroner [2012] EWHC 2783 [2013] ACD 22: acting on behalf of the Police Federation on the AG’s application to quash the Hillsborough inquests.
  • R. (on the application of Montgomery) v. Police Appeals Tribunal and the Commissioner [2012] EWHC 936 (Admin): important case on the operation of the police misconduct regime.
  • Attorney-General’s Reference No 107 of 2011 [2012] EWCA Crim 459: sentences of imprisonment for public protection.
  • R. (on the application of W) v Leeds Crown Court [2012] 1 Cr.App.R 13: power of the Crown Court to remit a child for trial in the Youth Court.
  • R. v Valentine [2012] 1 Cr.App.R.(S) 42: sentence for money launderers.
  • R (on the application of French) v Chief Constable of West Yorkshire Police [2011] EWHC 546 (Admin): challenge to decisions made in police      misconduct proceedings.
  • R (on the application of Kay) v Chief Constable  of Northumbria Police (no 2) [2010] ICR 974, [2010] EWHC 31 (Admin): whether the Chief Constable could be compelled to reinstate the Claimant following a declaration in earlier proceedings that he had acted  unlawfully and in breach of his duty in dispensing with her services as a probationary constable.
  • R (on the application of Kay) v Chief Constable of Northumbria Police (no 1) [2010] ICR 962, [2009] EWHC 1835 (Admin):  the Chief  Constable had acted unlawfully and in breach of his duty in dispensing with the services of a probationary constable.
  • R v Morley [2009] Times LR July 6:  minimum term on conviction for murder; post-mortem cannibalism.
  • R v Pola [2009] Crim LR 603: meaning of “employer” in health and safety legislation; [2010] 1 Cr.App.R  (S).6: compensation orders.
  • R v Rahman and others [2008] 3 W.L.R. 264: House of Lords; leading case on joint enterprise in homicide; also appeared in Court of Appeal (R v Rahman [2007] 2 Cr App R 16) and at first instance.
  • R v Hickinbottom [2007] Inquest LR 1: manslaughter by gross negligence.
  • R v Brady and Paton [2007] 1 Cr. App. R. (S) 117: minimum term on conviction for murder.
  • R v H.T.M Ltd [2007] 2 All ER 665: leading case on the reasonable practicability  “defence” in the Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974 and on the effect of regulation 21 of the Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999.
  • R (on the Application of Ashton) v Chief  Constable of West Yorkshire [2005] Po.LR 313.
  • Attorney-General’s Reference No 95 of 2004  [2004] EWCA Crim 3028: whether public service is a mitigating factor where an offence is  committed in private; relevance of complainant’s conduct in sentencing for domestic violence.
  • Southwick v State [2004] FJSC 3: human rights compatibility of the Criminal Procedure Code of Fiji – Supreme Court of Fiji.
  • Kelly v DPP [2003] Crim L.R 45: whether proximate events may constitute a  course of conduct for the purposes of the Protection from Harassment Act      1997.
  • Attorney-General’s Reference No 1 of 2002 [2002] Crim L.R 410: whether the common law offence of perverting the course of public justice is committed where false evidence is given or made, not to defeat what the witness believes to be the ends of justice, or not to procure what the witness believes to be a false verdict.
  • Attorney-General’s Reference No 25 of 2002 [2003] 1 Cr.App.R(S) 130(28): appropriate sentence for section 18 glassing.
  • R (on the application of Dawson) v HM Coroner for East Riding and Kingston upon Hull [2001] All ER (D) 246 A.C.D. 68: test for bias in inquest proceedings; bias alleged to result from counsel for the family conducting a relationship with a juror.
  • Boot v Police Complaints Authority [2001] EWHC Admin 982: human rights compatibility of the police complaints authority procedure.
  • R v Cerovic [2001] All ER (D) 14: whether D’s previous acquittal for the  attempted murder of S is admissible on D’s trial, a number of years later, on a charge of threatening to kill S.
  • R (on the application of Wilkinson) v Chief  Constable of West Yorkshire [2002] Po.LR 328: relevance at full JR hearing of alternative remedy decision at permission stage.

 

Other Information

Director of Advocacy Training, North Eastern Circuit since 2012.

Recent talks:

  • Advocacy in the Court of Appeal (with Pitchford L.J)
  • Changes to the Coronial System
  • Jury advocacy

 

 

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